Untitled

ghfjc77:

Because sometimes you have to remember that Tim Curry made your childhood.

arrendelle:

I wanted to regif his monologue for some reason whoops

dreamberks:

Frozen + Mean Girls quotes

pleatedjeans:

via

rogue-of-blood:

piccasa:

silvermoon424:

seerofsarcasm:

Alright, followers, especially younger ones, we need to have a quick talk. Some of you in the cosplay community may have heard of the very recent murder of a 15 year old girl who had gone to a 23 year old’s house in order to make cosplay, nicknamed the “cosplay killing” (a name I disagree with because the murder had nothing to do with cosplay itself).

You know, we all joke about how when we were all young our parents told us that everyone online was out to molest us, and we joke about it because we know that it’s far from true. That doesn’t, however, change the fact that there ARE people like that, and you should always be wary.

I’m not going to tell you to never meet people from online because in this day and age the internet is so prevalent that saying distrust everyone would be like saying distrust every stranger on the street, but I am going to tell you a few things, and they all boil down to being alert, smart, safe, and cautious. There are people out there who wish to do good people harm, and the internet is the perfect place for them to find victims.

  • Every person you are meeting online has just as equal a chance of being your murderer as they are your soulmate. 
  • Never, EVER meet someone alone. 
  • If you do choose to meet with someone, always bring a parent or trusted adult with you, tbh preferably male. Even if they don’t hang out with you and your new friend, they should be no farther than a table away at any time. Always have a parent or adult pick you up and drop you off, never get into a car with the person you’re meeting. 
  • If you’re a bit older (like me, i’m in my 20s) while you don’t need an adult because you are one, it’s best to have a large group of friends with you, again, preferably with some males (if you yourself aren’t male).
  • Never agree to go to a hotel room, home, apartment or secluded location with someone who you have just met. First meetings should always be in an incredibly public place with lots of people around.
  • Always carry with you one of the following: a taser, pepper spray, a defense stick, a knife, a whistle, or if you have a conceal carry permit, a weapon. They should be someplace both safe and hidden, like a purse or bag, but also be easily accessible. 
  • Be wary of large age differences. I’m sorry, but it’s true. This mainly applies when one party is under 18, especially under 16, and the other party is above 20. 
  • If the person you are meeting has a problem with any of this (you don’t really have to tell them about the weapon, but for the other things) that is a giant red flag and you should NOT go to see them. A TRUE friend or good person will say “I completely understand” and even then, just because you’ve known someone for a month doesn’t mean you know who they are or what their intentions are. No matter how well you think you know them, a relationship formed online should be treated differently than a relationship formed in person. Never let your guard down easily.

Currently, we don’t know how these two met, but small bits of information going around suggest it was through an online cosplay community. Always, ALWAYS, be safe, wary, cautious, and most of all alert when talking with people online. This is especially for my younger followers, you don’t want your mother to have to go through what this poor girl’s has gone through in the past week.  

The internet is a place that we’ve all come to feel safe at, but that safety is exactly what the evil people of this world search for when looking for victims like this poor girl, gone too soon. I would rather you look like an overcautious, untrusting person than a corpse, and remember that.

INCREDIBLY important, you guys. All of the above-mentioned tips can actually save your life. Thank you so much for posting this, I know a lot of people can be saved with this information!

I know I said I wouldn’t reblog a whole lot on this blog but I know a lot of my followers are into cosplay ad there are a lot of young people on tumblr here too so PLEASE pass this on !

THIS IS VERY FUCKING IMPORTANT.

fireflysneeze:

Plot Twist: the extreme cold in America is actually just Disney’s advertising campaign for Frozen

Queen / The Beatles - Fat Bottomed Girls Come Together
100,771 playsDownload

dreaming-in-the-60s:

gabiygs:

karliemccartney:

paul-youslut:

mostlymashups:

Fat Bottomed Girls - Queen

Come Together - The Beatles

OH GOD

image

I just cried out of my vagina

This is what Heaven sounds like

FAT BOTTOMED GIRLS COME TOGETHER OVEr ME

thegeekcooks:

This is basically what it’s like to be an adult

mcporno:

it’s ironic how middle school boys will make fun of the gay kid but then draw dicks on literally everything

kioewen:

What Elsa Represents
Numerous theories have been advanced as to what Elsa in Frozen represents, metaphorically, by her powers.
The most persuasive interpretation, and the one that Frozen's songwriting team have advanced in interviews, is that of Elsa as representing an exceptionally talented artist, grappling with and struggling to unleash her creative powers.
However, in her tragic isolation and alienation from the world, she would most specifically represent a Romantic artist, as described in this post.
Elsa’s artistic abilities express themselves in numerous ways in the film: as a singer, of course, but also as an architect, as a “sculptor of ice and snow” (as Idina Menzel once referred to her), as a painter (given the variety of colors that she creates in her ice), and even as an orchestra conductor, given that the motions with which she controls her magic resemble those of a conductor like Herbert von Karajan leading the Berlin Philharmonic.
Another association, closely related to that of Elsa as an artist, is that of Elsa representing the Nietzschean ideal of the Übermensch (see here and here), the great individual whose genius sets them above humanity, concomitantly incurring the resentment of the mob and causing them to be misunderstood; yet who, with their talents, can bestow great gifts of beauty and knowledge upon mankind, in Promethean fashion.
French child psychologists have also invoked Elsa’s storyline as an analogy for advanced children or gifted children (see here), who are often isolated from other youths, who lack worthy peers due to their superior intellect, and who are often introverted and sensitive by nature, yet who have a wealth of creativity and imagination just waiting to be unleashed, rather as Elsa finally unleashes her powers.
In addition to those associations, which present Elsa as representing exceptional individuals who surpass the common run of humanity, Elsa has also been related to various identity issues.
Her “Let It Go” anthem has been likened, among other things, to a coming-of-age metaphor, a tale of individuation, of a young girl — witness her gleeful, childlike expressions at the beginning of the song — blossoming into a desirable young woman.
Indeed, Elsa’s plight has been associated with that of women in general, particularly how modern society seeks to confine women to androgynous “career” paths promoted by feminism, from which Elsa breaks free in her dress-change scene, when she embraces her traditional femininity, her essential womanhood.
More broadly, Elsa’s character depicts the plight of individuals of an introverted nature, living in a world in which extroversion is applauded and introversion is misrepresented. Elsa’s story illustrates the conflicts that introverted individuals face when they need private time to themselves (feeling uncomfortable as they do in social situations) and are wrongly deemed “cold” as a result; yet who also do long for close, one-on-one connections, which they can seldom form.
Elsa has also been described as embodying, in a more tragic way, the plight of individuals burdened with various pathologies.
Communicable illnesses figure prominently in this interpretation, with how Elsa warns others to stay away from her for their own good. The idea that she might inadvertently harm someone, through an aspect of herself (a communicable disease of some sort) that she cannot control, bolsters this reading. This relates to how she wears gloves and wants everyone to stay away from her, for their own safety
Afflictions such as deafness also find a parallel in Elsa’s plight; indeed, the suffering that Ludwig van Beethoven endured due to his deafness (the shame of being deprived of hearing, the social ostracization that resulted from this, and his attempt to keep his affliction secret) seems uncannily similar to the ordeal that Elsa endures.
Themes of mental illness have also been advanced, from autism to anxiety to panic attacks to many others, the most acute of which can indeed lead the tragically afflicted individual to be sequestered and kept away from others, and can also cause them to lash out, unwillingly, on loved ones.
And finally, from the point of view of ideology, Elsa’s plight can be seen as representing that of individuals whose beliefs or values fly in the face of those of modern society, beliefs that must be kept secret, for fear of an individual being socially ostracized, losing employment, possibly even being criminally prosecuted.
Along these lines, Elsa could represent a paleoconservative in a society dominated by Cultural Marxism, or an ethno-nationalist in a world that is imposing multiculturalism and diversity, or a traditional Christian in a world promoting secularism.
In certain professions, being identified as holding such beliefs could cost a person their job. In certain social circles, being exposed as holding such beliefs could make a person a social outcast. And in certain European nations today, being exposed as holding such beliefs could be punishable by fines and imprisonment, just as dissidents in every era of human history have been stigmatized.
Elsa pushing away her sister, then, could be a metaphor for how a person who holds such iconoclastic beliefs wouldn’t want their family linked to themselves, for fear of having them condemned via guilt by association.
- - - -
In creating Elsa, Disney formulated a storyline that is richly applicable to dozens of different alienations and iconoclasms, any one of which can lead to social stigma, but which can also yield rich creative fruit and be a light unto the world. It is not reducible to just one, and never should be, but applies across many circumstances and conditions.
By making Elsa’s metaphorical significance so fluid, she is widely relatable to many individuals in a host of different ways.
(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)

kioewen:

What Elsa Represents

Numerous theories have been advanced as to what Elsa in Frozen represents, metaphorically, by her powers.

The most persuasive interpretation, and the one that Frozen's songwriting team have advanced in interviews, is that of Elsa as representing an exceptionally talented artist, grappling with and struggling to unleash her creative powers.

However, in her tragic isolation and alienation from the world, she would most specifically represent a Romantic artist, as described in this post.

Elsa’s artistic abilities express themselves in numerous ways in the film: as a singer, of course, but also as an architect, as a “sculptor of ice and snow” (as Idina Menzel once referred to her), as a painter (given the variety of colors that she creates in her ice), and even as an orchestra conductor, given that the motions with which she controls her magic resemble those of a conductor like Herbert von Karajan leading the Berlin Philharmonic.

Another association, closely related to that of Elsa as an artist, is that of Elsa representing the Nietzschean ideal of the Übermensch (see here and here), the great individual whose genius sets them above humanity, concomitantly incurring the resentment of the mob and causing them to be misunderstood; yet who, with their talents, can bestow great gifts of beauty and knowledge upon mankind, in Promethean fashion.

French child psychologists have also invoked Elsa’s storyline as an analogy for advanced children or gifted children (see here), who are often isolated from other youths, who lack worthy peers due to their superior intellect, and who are often introverted and sensitive by nature, yet who have a wealth of creativity and imagination just waiting to be unleashed, rather as Elsa finally unleashes her powers.

In addition to those associations, which present Elsa as representing exceptional individuals who surpass the common run of humanity, Elsa has also been related to various identity issues.

Her “Let It Go” anthem has been likened, among other things, to a coming-of-age metaphor, a tale of individuation, of a young girl — witness her gleeful, childlike expressions at the beginning of the song — blossoming into a desirable young woman.

Indeed, Elsa’s plight has been associated with that of women in general, particularly how modern society seeks to confine women to androgynous “career” paths promoted by feminism, from which Elsa breaks free in her dress-change scene, when she embraces her traditional femininity, her essential womanhood.

More broadly, Elsa’s character depicts the plight of individuals of an introverted nature, living in a world in which extroversion is applauded and introversion is misrepresented. Elsa’s story illustrates the conflicts that introverted individuals face when they need private time to themselves (feeling uncomfortable as they do in social situations) and are wrongly deemed “cold” as a result; yet who also do long for close, one-on-one connections, which they can seldom form.

Elsa has also been described as embodying, in a more tragic way, the plight of individuals burdened with various pathologies.

Communicable illnesses figure prominently in this interpretation, with how Elsa warns others to stay away from her for their own good. The idea that she might inadvertently harm someone, through an aspect of herself (a communicable disease of some sort) that she cannot control, bolsters this reading. This relates to how she wears gloves and wants everyone to stay away from her, for their own safety

Afflictions such as deafness also find a parallel in Elsa’s plight; indeed, the suffering that Ludwig van Beethoven endured due to his deafness (the shame of being deprived of hearing, the social ostracization that resulted from this, and his attempt to keep his affliction secret) seems uncannily similar to the ordeal that Elsa endures.

Themes of mental illness have also been advanced, from autism to anxiety to panic attacks to many others, the most acute of which can indeed lead the tragically afflicted individual to be sequestered and kept away from others, and can also cause them to lash out, unwillingly, on loved ones.

And finally, from the point of view of ideology, Elsa’s plight can be seen as representing that of individuals whose beliefs or values fly in the face of those of modern society, beliefs that must be kept secret, for fear of an individual being socially ostracized, losing employment, possibly even being criminally prosecuted.

Along these lines, Elsa could represent a paleoconservative in a society dominated by Cultural Marxism, or an ethno-nationalist in a world that is imposing multiculturalism and diversity, or a traditional Christian in a world promoting secularism.

In certain professions, being identified as holding such beliefs could cost a person their job. In certain social circles, being exposed as holding such beliefs could make a person a social outcast. And in certain European nations today, being exposed as holding such beliefs could be punishable by fines and imprisonment, just as dissidents in every era of human history have been stigmatized.

Elsa pushing away her sister, then, could be a metaphor for how a person who holds such iconoclastic beliefs wouldn’t want their family linked to themselves, for fear of having them condemned via guilt by association.

- - - -

In creating Elsa, Disney formulated a storyline that is richly applicable to dozens of different alienations and iconoclasms, any one of which can lead to social stigma, but which can also yield rich creative fruit and be a light unto the world. It is not reducible to just one, and never should be, but applies across many circumstances and conditions.

By making Elsa’s metaphorical significance so fluid, she is widely relatable to many individuals in a host of different ways.

(My own extended review of Frozen appears [here].)